Attributes and Qualities

Your Attribute and Quality scores will affect your character’s physical and social interactions with the world, including combat. You are allowed 40 Attribute points and 24 Quality points that you can distribute however you like, but there are some rules. At a character level of 1, the minimum value an Attribute or Quality can have is 4, and the maximum value allowed is 12. Of course, over the course of your campaign, these values can exceed 12 or even go below 4. Quality points are easier to distribute as they define how you want your character to interact with the world around them, but Attribute points can get a little confusing, since these values will directly affect your Character Stats. The quick start builds that were presented with each class are a good starting point for figuring out these specifics.

 

 

Attributes

The five attributes affect your physical interactions with the world, and are primarily used to calculate your Character Stats. At level 1, each player will have 40 attribute points to place into 5 attributes. A single attribute may only have a maximum of 12 points at level 1, and each attribute must have a minimum of 4 points invested in them. An attribute score of 6 is considered average and every point above or below a score of 6 modifies your stats and rolls according to those attributes by that many points. Be mindful in how you spend your attribute points as these scores will scarcely change throughout the rest of your journey.

Strength: Physical Damage, Physical Evasion, Carrying Limit
Strength determines how physically strong you are—not just inherently, but also how much flow you augment your body with. The higher it is, the easier to succeed in feats of physical strength, such as lifting or pushing large objects, outmuscling an opponent, or intimidating someone. Your Physical Damage is equal to your Strength Modifier, your Physical Evasion is increased by your Strength Modifier divided by three, and your Carrying Limit is specific to your Strength Score.

Spirit: Magic Damage, Magic Evasion, Flow Points, Flow Point Regeneration
Spirit determines how spiritually aware and connected you are with flow. Higher spirit allows for better concentration and manipulation of flow. Characters with high spirit can detect things that others may not normally be able to. Your Magic Damage is equal to your Spirit Modifier, your Magic Evasion is increased by your Spirit Modifier divided by three, your Flow Points are increased by your Spirit Modifier divided by two, and your Flow Point Regeneration is increased by your Spirit Modifier divided by two.

Vitality: Health Points, Health Point Regeneration, Fatigue Recovery
Vitality determines your endurance and stamina, both in and out of battle. While not always the strongest or the fastest, high vitality characters can take on long, laborious tasks with very little rest. Characters can stay awake longer in the day, and be less exhausted after engagements. Your Health Points are increased by your Vitality Modifier, your Health Point Regeneration is increased by your Vitality Modifier divided by two, and your Fatigue is reduced by 10% for every point of your Vitality Modifier up to a maximum of 60%.

Dexterity: Accuracy
Determines how skilled you are with your hands. In battle, it affects how accurately you can direct your attacks. Out of battle, high dexterity characters have great sleight of hand. They're capable of doing things like pickpocketing without getting caught, lock picking, and performing a plethora of everyday tasks with ease. Your Accuracy is equal to your Dexterity Modifier.

Agility: Physical Evasion, Magic Evasion, Movement Speed
Determines how nimble and quick you are on your feet. By having high agility, a character can move further in a single turn and has a higher chance of evading attacks. High agility characters are not only fast, but are also less hindered by the terrain in their surroundings. Your Physical Evasion and Magic Evasion are increased by your Agility Modifier divided by two, and your Movement Speed is equal to your total Agility times five plus 30’.

 

 

Qualities

Qualities are separate attributes that act differently from the other attributes and rather than affecting direct combat stats, they mostly only affect your social interactions with the world. Each player has 24 points to put into the 3 qualities. A single quality can only have a maximum of 12 points at level 1, and each quality must have a minimum of 4 points invested in them. A quality score of 6 is considered average and every point above or below a score of 6 modifies your rolls pertaining to that quality by that many points.

Observation
Observation is a measurement of your awareness and attunement to your surroundings. It allows you to search or find things more easily as well as perceiving potential danger or misconduct. Players with high observation are able to notice tracks, find traps, eavesdrop on conversations, notice when someone is lying, determine weak spots on a creature, see how healthy a creature is, avoid dangerous terrain, and many more things. If you can observe it, you can do it.

Charisma
Charisma is a measurement of the strength of your personality and your social skills. It determines your ability to deceive, intimidate, persuade, and lead others. Players with high charisma are easily trusted, whether their intentions are good or not, and have an easier time gathering information from other people. Likewise, players with low charisma are easily manipulated or bullied.

Knowledge
Knowledge is a measurement of the overall amount of things you have learned about the world. It allows you to recall pieces of information you have gathered through travels and studies. Players with high knowledge are more likely to be familiar with legends, myths, facts, lore, and history. It also allows you to know things about various creatures, flora, environments, and cultures that may not commonly be known. If you can think it, you might know it. You may learn an extra language for every three points of your Knowledge Modifier.

 

 

Modifiers

Modifiers are what you add or subtract to your rolls when doing an attribute or quality check. They are calculated by taking your scores in each attribute and quality and subtracting them by six. For example, a Strength score of 9 would have a Strength Modifier of +3. Attribute modifiers also affect your combat stats in varying degrees, but quality modifiers mostly only affect your social interactions in the world. Negative modifiers do not affect combat stats and are considered zero when using them in calculations. These modifiers are written next to your attribute and quality scores, and whenever you perform an action pertaining to any of those attributes or qualities, your roll will be affected by its modifier.

 

 

Attribute and Quality Checks

Often throughout a campaign, players will want to perform actions that will require an attribute or quality check. Checks are made by rolling 2d6 and adding your attribute or quality modifier. The success of the roll is determined by the GM based on how difficult the player’s action will be. Below is a table that gives an approximation of the difficulty of tasks:

Difficulty Roll Examples
Easy 6-8 Break open a wooden door, sensing a strong magical presence
Moderate 9-11 Identify an uncommon creature, pull an all-nighter
Hard 12-15 Picking a regular lock, interpret hand signals
Very Hard 16-18 Finding a secret passage, recall rare facts or mythos
Nearly Impossible 19-21 Disarm a magical trap, dodge an unforeseen projectile
Godlike 22+ Intimidating a god, outmuscling a giant creature

For certain actions, players may be able to help one another with their checks. When a player helps their ally with an attribute or quality check, their ally rolls with Advantage. In addition, their result is further increased by half of the player’s attribute or quality modifier. Be aware, however, that if you have a modifier of -2, you will end up decreasing their result by 1.

If a player rolls a natural 12 from their 2d6 roll, they Critically Hit their check, and will perform the check to the best of their character’s ability. They might not succeed in what they were doing, but they won’t completely fail either. For example, a player with low Spirit might not be able to disarm a magical trap with a Critical Hit, but they won’t end up triggering it either. However, if a player rolls a natural 2, they Critically Miss their check, and will utterly fail to perform the check no matter how high their attribute or quality modifier is. Critically Hitting or Missing an Attribute or Quality Check is a bit different from Critically Hitting or Missing an attack in combat, which is detailed in the Battle System section.

 

 

Opposing Checks

Opposing checks are much like regular checks; however, they are done with two or more units. Opposing checks are simple. All contesting parties perform an attribute or quality check, and whoever rolls the highest wins. In the event of a tie, those who tied for highest will perform subsequent rolls until there is one winner. Usually, the attribute check will use the same attribute for all parties, such as using agility in a foot race. However, sometimes situations will arise that will allow for different attributes or qualities to have opposing checks. For example, someone making an observation check to see if a person doing a charisma check is actually lying or not.

 

 

Character Stats

Now that you know the values and modifiers of your Attributes, you are able to calculate your Character Stats. Here is a list of how to calculate each stat:

Health Points: Base HP + HP Growth * Level + Vitality Modifier * Level
For example, a level 1 Arcane Ranger with a +2 Vitality Modifier will have Health Points equal to 25 + 1d6 + 2, which will range anywhere between 28 and 33 total Health Points. Since your Health Points scale with your level, do note that if your Vitality Modifier ever increases, it will retroactively increase your Health Points as if you had that Modifier every level. For example, let’s say a level 4 Arcane Ranger with a +2 Vitality Modifier has 45 HP, and they just leveled up to 5, deciding to increase their Vitality attribute to get a Modifier of +3. To calculate their new HP, they would use the equation 45 + 1d6 + 3 + 4. Notice that there is a 4 at the end, which represents the number of levels they previously had with a lower Modifier. Be aware, however, that the opposite will happen if your Vitality Modifier decreases.

Health Points are a measure of how much your character’s body is protected by your flow before becoming incapacitated. Stay incapacitated for too long without being resuscitated and your character will die, so be careful!

Flow Points: Base FP + FP Growth * Level + Spirit Modifier/2 * Level
For example, a level 1 Arcane Ranger with a +6 Spirit Modifier will have Flow Points equal to 18 + 1d4 + 3, which will range anywhere between 22 and 26 total Flow Points. Since your Flow points scale with your level, do not that if your Spirit Modifier ever increases, it will retroactively increase your Flow Points as if you had that Modifier every level. For example, let’s say a level 4 Arcane Ranger with a +5 Spirit Modifier has 36 FP, and they just leveled up to 5, deciding to increase their Spirit attribute to get a Modifier of +6. To calculate their new FP, they would use the equation 36 + 1d4 + 3 + 4. Notice that there is a 4 at the end, which represents the number of levels they previously had with a lower Modifier. Be aware, however, that the opposite will happen if your Spirit Modifier decreases.

Flow Points are a resource that allows your character to perform different skills. If you run out of Flow Points, you will no longer be able to use skills.

Physical Damage: Strength Modifier (minimum of 0)
For example, a character with a Strength Modifier of +4 will have 4 Physical Damage. Conversely, a character with a Strength Modifier of -2 will still have 0 Physical Damage.

Physical Damage is the amount of damage applied to your Normal Attacks and Skills if your character’s class scales with Physical Damage.

Magic Damage: Spirit Modifier (minimum of 0)
For example, a character with a Spirit Modifier of +4 will have 4 Magic Damage. Conversely, a character with a Spirit Modifier of -2 will still have 0 Magic Damage.

Magic Damage is the amount of damage applied to your Normal Attacks and Skills if your character’s class scales with Magic Damage.

Accuracy: Dexterity Modifier (minimum of 0)
For example, a character with a Dexterity Modifier of +2 will have 2 Accuracy. Conversely, a character with a Dexterity Modifier of -2 will still have 0 Accuracy.

Your character’s Accuracy supplements their ability to hit their target when rolling to hit.

Physical Evasion: Strength Modifier/3 + Agility Modifier/2 (minimum of 0)
For example, a character with a Strength Modifier of +4 and an Agility Modifier of +2 will have 2 Physical Evasion. Conversely, a character with a Strength Modifier of -2 and an Agility Modifier of -2 will still have 0 Physical Evasion.

Your character’s Physical Evasion supplements their ability to avoid a physical attack when rolling to evade.

Magic Evasion: Spirit Modifier/3 + Agility Modifier/2 (minimum of 0)
For example, a character with a Spirit Modifier of +4 and an Agility Modifier of +2 will have 2 Magic Evasion. Conversely, a character with a Spirit Modifier of -2 and an Agility Modifier of -2 will still have 0 Magic Evasion.

Your character’s Magic Evasion supplements their ability to avoid a magical attack when rolling to evade.

Movement Speed: 30’ + Agility * 5’
For example, a character with an Agility score of 8 will have a Movement Speed of 30’ + 8*5’, which is 70’ in total.

Movement Speed is a measure of distance in feet of how far your character is able to travel on foot in a single turn, or 10 seconds. Movement Speed cannot be reduced below 10'.

Carrying Limit:
Carrying limit is based on your Strength Score as shown in the table below.

Strength Score Carrying Limit Strength Score Carrying Limit
1 12 lb. 11 132 lb.
2 16 lb. 12 156 lb.
3 22 lb. 13 182 lb.
4 30 lb. 14 210 lb.
5 40 lb. 15 240 lb.
6 52 lb. 16 272 lb.
7 66 lb. 17 306 lb.
8 82 lb. 18 342 lb.
9 90 lb. 19 380 lb.
10 110 lb. 20 420 lb.

Carrying Limit is the maximum amount of weight a character can carry on their person without being encumbered. For every X pounds over your Carrying Limit where X is your Strength Score, or major fraction thereof, your Movement Speed is reduced by 10’, Accuracy is reduced by 2, Physical Evasion and Magic Evasion is reduced by 2, and you receive a -2 penalty to Agility checks.

Health Point Regeneration: 1 + Vitality Modifier/2 (minimum of 1)
For example, a character with a Vitality Modifier of +2 will have an HPR equal to 1 + 2/2, which is 2. Conversely, a character with a Vitality Modifier of -2 would theoretically have an HPR equal to 1 + (-2)/2, which is 0, but will instead have an HPR of 1.

Health Points do not magically refresh after a battle, and the damage you’ve taken will persist to the next encounter you might face. However, when characters are asleep, they will regain HP equal to their HPR for every hour they spend asleep.

Flow Point Regeneration: 1 + Spirit Modifier/2 (minimum of 1)
For example, a character with a Spirit Modifier of +2 will have an FPR equal to 1 + 2/2, which is 2. Conversely, a character with a Spirit Modifier of -2 would theoretically have an FPR equal to 1 + (-2)/2, which is 0, but will instead have an FPR of 1.

Flow Points do not magically refresh after a battle, and points you’ve spent will persist to the next encounter you might face. However, when characters are asleep, they will regain FP equal to their FPR for every hour they spend asleep.

Fatigue Recovery per Hour: 3 + Vitality Modifier/2
For example, a character with a Vitality Modifier of +2 will have an FR/hr. equal to 3 + 2/2, which is 4. Conversely, a character with a Vitality Modifier of -2 will have an FR/hr. equal to 3 + (-2)/2, which is 2. This is the only case where a negative attribute modifier will negatively affect your character stats.

Fatigue is gained after battles and through extended periods of adventuring. Your character’s fatigue will continue to increase if you do not stop to rest, which causes detriments. However, when characters are asleep, they will reduce the amount of fatigue they currently have by an amount equal to their FR/hr. for every hour they spend asleep.